Category Archives: Health

WATCH: Inside promising new colon cancer treatments


Transcript for Inside promising new colon cancer treatments

Now to that “Gma” health alert about colon cancer. It’s the second leading cause of cancer deaths in America and now it’s on the rise among young adults. We spoke with one young patient who beat it and the medical team that helped her. It was just about the last news I was expecting to hear. Reporter: At just 24 years old, Dana rye was diagnosed with colon cancer. She’s part of an unsettling trend. Young adults developing one of the deadliest forms of cancer. The first time symptoms appeared for me I was 17 years old in high school and experienced a little bit of rectal 3w4r50eding and said this is what webmd told me it could be and the doctor laughed in my face and said there was no possible way at my age it could be colon cancer. Reporter: Experts suggest adults get screened for colon cancer at 50 years old, 45 for African-Americans but according to a study by the American cancer society, colon cancer rates are rising in adults as young as their 20s and 30s with death rates for this group also increasing. And though the overall risks of colorectal cancers at this ages is still low millennials born in 1990 now face double the risk of colon cancer as a person born in 1950 did at the same age. In our patients with young onset colorectal cancer under 50 what we’re seeing they don’t have a family history or any known genetic predisposition. Reporter: This doctor is behind the first of its kind study at memorial sloan-kettering. If we can identify the patients that are at risk for getting this disease at such a young age we can diagnose them earlier. Their approach, combining research with clinical care to tackle the problem. We hope to provide a broader, more holistic approach of medical care to our patients. Reporter: After six months of grueling treatment, Dana is now 32 years old and eight years cancer-free. If there are changes in your body to know that — recognize them and make sure to investigate them. Yes, and Jen is nodding along about that knowing your body so what is behind this increase? You know, it’s not clear and we don’t know. There are some suggestions and a recent study that came out of sloan-kettering suggests a couple of factors. Increase in polyps. There is a definite delay in getting that patient a colonoscopy. Bleeding that then is attributed to hemorrhoids instead of colon cancer, the cost of a colonoscopy, can be difficult for insurance companies to cover it and all contributes to misdiagnosis so we have to be clear. It is still higher risk if you’re over the age of 50 but this age group, the rise is concerning. It is very concerning. So what about signs, symptom, prevention? This is where people need to pay attention. Even young people because this can be life saving so signs or symptoms. Number one, any type of I regular bleeding, any change in bowel habits. Weight loss unintentional, persistent cramps, gas or pain. If you notice those be persistent. This applies to the medical profession as well and think of this but you have to talk about prevention because that is really important. So when you talk about colorectal cancer, the things that are associated with lower your risk, diet, very important, not smoking, limiting alcohol and keeping your weight in a healthy range for some people, aspirin has been shown to lower the risk but not recommended for everyone across the board. Something you were adamant about discussing, lynch syndrome. I’ve never heard of it. You’re not along. Even some doctors don’t think of lynch syndrome. This is one of the most common heredity trance ss. 1 out of 300 people may be a carrier for this gene. What is. It has an associated increased risk of colorectal cancer and other cancers, endometrial cancer so it’s on my radar as a gynecologist but increased risk of stomach cancer, breast cancer sore for those genetic testing is important. Testing, that’s how you find it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.



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Even short bursts of exercise can reduce Americans' risk of disease and death: Study


Do the national exercise guidelines need a change? That’s a question raised by a new study by researchers at the National Cancer Institute and the National Institutes of Health.

Americans are bombarded with mixed messages: Exercise only counts if you do it this way or that way, or for a short time or a long time. Confused, some seem to be willing to sit down on the couch and wait till all the recommendations are straightened out. But with the benefits of exercise so important to health, this study hopes to bring some clarity and reassure people that some is better than none — and that it is linked to curtailing premature death.

“Virtually all [studies] report that higher volume of [moderate or vigorous physical activity, MVPA], whether performed intermittently or in sustained bouts, lowers all-cause mortality,” wrote Deborah Rohm Young and William L. Haskell in an editorial accompanying research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

PHOTO: Women work out on exercise bikes at a gym.STOCK/Getty Images
Women work out on exercise bikes at a gym.

The old benchmark of 150 minutes per week of moderate activity (or 75 minutes of vigorous activity) originated in 1995. The “rules”: Each time you exercise, it should be for at least 10 minutes.

“For about 30 years, guidelines have suggested that moderate-to-vigorous activity could provide health benefits, but only if you sustained the activity for 10 minutes or more,” an author of the research, William E. Kraus, M.D., of the Duke University School of Medicine, said in a press release. “That flies in the face of public health recommendations, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator, and parking farther from your destination. Those don’t take 10 minutes, so why were they recommended?”

The new study finds that the length of each bout or episode of exercise is unrelated to the benefit seen in living longer. Five minutes of jogging, researchers said, “counts” toward better health.

The study used information from accelerometers, like those found in cellphones and FitBit watches, which can measure certain types of motion. Researchers utilized the ActiGraph AM-7164 and corresponding information from the National Center for Health Statistics and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 2003 to 2006.

PHOTO: People workout at a gym.STOCK/Getty Images
People workout at a gym.

To be counted in the study, the people wearing the ActiGraph had to wear it at least one day, for at least 10 hours, up to a maximum of a week. Researchers followed almost 5,000 people over the age of 40 for more than six years. They considered the people in two groups: Those who had bouts of exercise approximately five minutes in length, and those whose exercise lasted more than 10 minutes.

Getting about 60 minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity cut the risk of death over the time period by half, while getting about 100 minutes per day cut the risk to approximately 75 percent — and it was the total time moving, not the length of exercise that mattered.

PHOTO: Check out four things that can ruin your gym workout.Getty Images
Check out four things that can ruin your gym workout.

Those exercising at the highest rate were rare. Young and Haskell cautioned that “the majority of our sample did not accumulate any [moderate-to-vigorous physical activity] in bouts of 10 minutes with [the higher] threshold.” The analysis cites “unpublished findings” that they claim bolster their argument.

The editorial warns that this study didn’t discriminate between intentional exercise sets (going for a brisk walk) and unintentional physical activity (walking around the house doing chores, or walking up a flight of stairs).

For that, Young and Haskell said, what’s needed is a study that asks people to deliberately perform exercise of short, medium and lengthy “bouts” and track their health.

“Experimental studies are needed … [and] would provide necessary information that would be required to change national physical activity guidelines on [moderate-to-vigorous physical activity] bout lengths,” they said in the editorial.

Dr. John Byun is a radiation oncology resident based at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and a resident in the ABC News Medical Unit.



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WATCH: Children more likely than before to draw scientists as women, study shows


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    WATCH: Breast cancer testing may need to be tailored by race: Study


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    WATCH: Learning resilience from Olympic athletes


    Transcript for Learning resilience from Olympic athletes

    ??? Time for the “Weekend download.” We’ve all been so impressed with the mental toughness. The olympic athletes. I spoke with Bonnie St. John author of “My crow-resilience to find out how we can get some of that toughness in our own lives. Bonnie, good morning. Thanks for being with us. Thank you. We want to know how can we have the toughness of an olympian? How do we do that? Having a ritual for focus was always one of the things that gave me an edge. Lots come physically prepared but the pressure of high winds and delays we’ve seen in Korea, you have to have the mental toughness so whatever you’re doing whether an exam like you said or coaching or a presentation at work, take time out to separate yourself from the chatter, from the texts, from all the distraction, focus, visualize what it is you need to do. Everyone can learn to do that. I found that incredibly useful in my own life. Once you’re doing the things that you’re giving a presentation, what if you make a mistake how do you recover. That’s what happened to me. I fell in the slalom. I was ahead in the first run and in the second run there was this dangerous icy patch and I fell but I got up, got over the finish line quickly and still won the bronze medal I’m wearing. The woman would won, she also fell, but she got up faster. She won by being the quicker getter-upper. That’s a skill. Practice getting up even when you don’t think you’re doing well. Get up faster. Quicker getter-upper. It’s not over when it’s over. What about the postgame? How do you exhibit strength? It’s not natural to have charm and act like a champion after a disappointment. So we have to learn to discipline our emotions. Lindsey vonn was great in the giant slalom when she didn’t win. She came back and with a smile and said, I did my best. I made a mistake. Bonnie St. John, I appreciate it. Great points. All of them. %-Pif you wanttohearmuchmoreof my conversation with Bonnie check out the 10% happier podcast wherever you get your podcasts and right back with

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.



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    WATCH: Soy milk top among plant-based milks, study reports


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    WATCH: Celebrity meditation guru shares simple guide to meditating live on 'GMA'


    Transcript for Celebrity meditation guru shares simple guide to meditating live on ‘GMA’

    We are here with Bob Roth, the meditation teacher to the stars. He’s worked with Katy Perry, Michael J. Fox, Jersey seinfeld and Hugh Jackman just to name a few. The two of you. You do know your audience. You really got me excited. This was the greatest gift you gave me, George, when you introduced me to this man who has a new book, “Strength in stillness.” Please welcome Bob Roth. I mean that. I really do. You gave me a gift. I know, there was a time that something was really crazy going on in the studio and I was losing it and look at George. He was so calm and I said I want some of that and he said, it’s you. And talk about meditation and how the analogy to an ocean. Well, first of all it’s not me, it’s the technique. The technique is what works but I appreciate that. I like to use when I describe transcendental meditation, I like to use the analogy of an ocean. We know an ocean can be very turbulent on the surface but by its nature an ocean is very silent and calm at its depth and the mind is the same. The surface of our mind is that active gotta, gotta monkey mind, all the millions of things we have to do and every one of us has a desire to have some inner calm we like to have upper equanimity, equilibrium. Is there such a thing as an inner and if so how did we get there and transcendental meditation is a simple, natural technique that gives effortless access to the stillness that lies within. You keep using the word technique. It captures your voice and the way you approach people and I think a lot of people may be watching at home and think, oh, transcendental meditation, that sounds like a religion. I’m never going to be able to quiet my mind down but it’s a technique. How did you feel? That’s what I was like when you came to me. I’m not sure this is going to work for me. I don’t want all this metaphysical Cal stuff but would love to learn how to find some peace, some calm. I am by nature a very skeptical person. I don’t — I love science. I love practicality so in that way you would think I’m not your typical meditation teacher but I think that whole understanding of typical meditation teacher needs to be brushed aside. We’re talking in transcendental meditation a medical tool that can just give anyone access whether they believe in it or not you can be 100% skeptical and anyone can learn it. How to allow the active thinking mind to just access calm and when that happens, your body according to research gains a profound state of rest. You say it’s what the mind wants. Yes. The nature of the mind, that’s the interesting thing. There are many meditations that I think many think of, oh, I could never do it. I could never clear my mind of thoughts. When I heard that, someone said clear your mind, I said, all right, I’ll create peace in the Middle East. But in transcendental meditation, we just effortlessly access these deeper quieter calmer levels that are already there and it happens effortlessly because the nature of the mind is to be drawn to something more satisfying and inside most satisfying. Also like to have no expectations and everything in life, we have expectations and intentions but when we meditate it’s just the opposite but one thing people are concerned about, time. The time, the amount of time. Does it have to be the 20 minutes. I told this story, a man came into the office with his 14-year-old son and he was complaining, said, I want to do this but 20 minutes twice a day, once in the morning, once in the afternoon, who has the time? And his son who must have done the math said, dad, there’s 1,440 minutes in a day. You don’t have 40 minutes to take care of yourself? So kind of shut him up and learned to meditate. You like it. You look forward to it. It’s not hard work. I think it creates time. I think if you invest in 40 minutes a day you go through the rest of the 22 hours, whatever, 23 hours feeling more calm, more focused, more connected to everyone around you and that’s invaluable. It’s who we are when we’re not stressed. Stress is just — sticks to us so you do this first thing in the morning, you get up 20 minutes earlier and people say, are you kidding? I need my sleep. You said that to me and I thought you were nuts. It’s deeper than sleep. Do it first thing in the morning. It’s an investment. More resilient. Have more energy, more focus, you get things done faster, more efficiently and you’re enjoying it. It caughts you and energized you at the same time. It’s the oddest thing. Give us a quick little quiet time. So as I said, to learn transcendental meditation it’s taught in personal instruction I wanted to say. One-to-one. I don’t have the time to do that here but the first thing that you have to do when you meditate is you close your eyes. There are many meditation techniques that tell you to push out thoughts, this isn’t. So it’s just a simple thing. Close your eyes for a moment. Everybody, do that. Do that. And then just know when you learn this technique we will give you a mantra which is a word and sound and teach you how to access the deepest level of your own being and when you do that, your body gains profound rest and you come out energized so you can open your eyes now but just know that the simplicity of closing your eyes then you learn this technique from a teacher and it can transform your life. That is true. Bob, thanks for coming in. Offering for our crew to do this for us and we’re so grateful. Bring it home with you because “Strength in stillness” is out now and we’ll be right back.

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.



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    WATCH: Flu season one of the worst in nearly a decade, officials say


    Transcript for Flu season one of the worst in nearly a decade, officials say

    Next, this evening, new concerns over the deadly flu epidemic. Doctors in the northeast say the rapid flu tests that help diagnose know quickly are now in short supply, as well. And in New Hampshire tonight, a mother of four dying of flu complications. She had decided against taking ant anti-viral medication. Here’s ABC’s linsey Davis, on this again tonight. Reporter: Hospitals and clinics across the country now trying to stave off what officials are calling the worst one of the worst flu seasons in nearly a decade with the best defense possible — free flu shots. In New York — would you categorize this as a severe flu season? Yes, it is severe now. It certainly is severe now. Reporter: Nearly 8,000 confirmed cases of the flu last week in New York state. Close to 2,000 patients hospitalized. This doctor tells us those rapid tests used to quickly diagnose the flu are in short supply in the New York area. Most urgent care centers don’t have them and the major suppliers can’t provide them right now. I’m just feeling exhausted. You know, I still got achy pains right now. Reporter: Ronald Townsend was just diagnosed with the flu today. Yeah, I took the flu shot this year and I caught the flu. Reporter: One of the latest victims, 35-year-old Amanda king, a mother of four from new Hampshire. She was just getting rest and fluids and doing everything she thought was right. Reporter: Her family says she didn’t take anti-viral medication because she worried about the side effects. Two days later, she got sicker. She died on the way to the hospital. This has been such a horrific flu season. We know doctors recommend the ant anti-viral drugs, to lessen the symptoms of the flu. And linsey, I wanted to get back to that patient who had a flu shot, still got the flu. Doctors have told us that even if you have the shot and still get it, that the vaccine often helps knock down the severity of the flu once you do get it? Reporter: That’s correct, David. Doctors say even when you get the flu shot, if it doesn’t prevent the flu, it can lessen the see theirty of the flu and keep up out of the hospital. David? All right, linsey Davis with us tonight.

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.



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