Category Archives: Health

WATCH: HPV test may be better than Pap smears at detecting early cervical cancer: Study


Transcript for HPV test may be better than Pap smears at detecting early cervical cancer: Study

We want T Tur to a “Gma” health alert. A new stu could make the pap smear a thing O the past. Everyan said halleluj more than 1000 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer th year and now a Massi clinical trial finds that the HPV test is better than the traditional pap smear in detecting early signs of the disease. Good morning. Tell about the study and whathis could really mean. Ts appeared in journal of the American medical association.” A study done inanada and followed W over a fourear period and divided them into three groups. Wo screened using jus the HPV, THA the human papillomavirus test ane and women screened with tonal liquid bas pap and aafety ground the women sned just with the HPV test had a lower chance ofeveloping the precancerous lesion that we rry about passing to cervical cancer again the ce of the virus tended to trump the abnormal cells on the pap smear. Nicole wrote in to us on Twitter asking why isn’t HPV testing standard during a pap if so much of the populatioas it? The good new for women listening for the most in this country already is. Womeould ask if there I autic reflex HPV testing. Notomething thetor has to say now I’ll check you F HPV. It’s done wi same instruments as the P. These are the instruments use a traditional pap smear. Nothing scary here, same instruments are done to do the hpest. Pap smear looks a cells and Ng look at DNA of virus which sexually — Next time we go to the doctor do we ask for an HPV St? Yhould ask if reflex test something done when they geteened with a pap smear Beuse this is not going away. We still need more long-term follow-up and data they need to ask when my rest is back is it Normal O abnormal and ask for th specificerminology and management of abnormal pap smears is based on whether or not there’s HPV there, T age of patient and that patience’s pticular pap history. Anyth else women can doo lower their risk? There is and the single test advance for cercal is aside fromheap smear screg is the HPV vaccine. This ishat prove the majority O cervical cancer which is cau by this virus. So getti vaccinatedor women and mento the age of 26, very important and thensmoking, it’s bad for the whole body but ‘S really bad for the rvix. Gre informati as always. Gi.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.



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Electric shock therapy on special needs students: Treatment or torment?


A Massachusetts school for special needs children can continue to use a form of electric shock therapy on students after a long-running battle with state officials over the controversial treatment was decided in their favor.

The Judge Rotenberg Center in Canton is the only learning center in the country to use the graduated electronic decelerator to control the behavior of students with development delays.

The commonwealth had been trying since 2013 to ban the practice, but last week, Judge Katherine Fields, the first justice of the Bristol County Probate and Family Court, sided with the school.

The school did not respond to a request for comment, but instead directed ABC News to contact the JRC Parents Group, which said in a statement, “No one loves our children more than we do; we have tried and continue to try everything available to them, including positive behavior therapies and medications to help our children, but as the Court found – there is no evidence that any alternative treatment would be effective to treat our children and keep them safe.”

What is the treatment?

According to the FDA, the GED is used for “aversive conditioning.” That’s a psychology term meaning giving a negative stimulation whenever a particular unwanted action occurs. For example, people put a rubber band around their wrist and “snap” it whenever they have a cigarette; the goal is for the behavior to eventually be eliminated because of the association.

The GED works by delivering skin shocks for particular behaviors, trying to eliminate the behaviors.

The JRC Parents’ Group told ABC News, “It is a treatment of last resort. That is the important part to know about GED.”

What is it used for?

At JRC, the electrical shocks associated with GED are used to prevent and control self-injury or violent aggression. The skin shock might be used when the patient is aggressive against someone else (hitting, biting, or throwing things), or even to themselves (slamming their own head against a wall, or trying to hurt themselves in another way).

“There is a process the committee goes through where the therapy is peer reviewed to see what has been tried and what worked. Some of these parents have been dealing with these issues for 15 years; there are times when children attack their own parents. To people who think we don’t care, it’s not that, but it is an option when everything else fails,” said the JRC Parents’ Group.

Is it painful?

GED is not the same as Electroconvulsive therapy (ETC), which is when volts of electricity are directed towards the brain to treat depression. However, it does deliver painful shocks to the skin to condition patients with autism or behavioral disorders to stop a certain behavior or action.

What are the benefits and drawbacks?

While use of GED may slow down the student’s aggressive or inappropriate behavior, it’s a management technique, not something that will treat the underlying cause of the problem. While aversive treatment can be useful in stopping a behavior, it is hard to regulate what is considered excessive and what will be successful for certain patients as opposed to others.

Additionally, it’s virtually impossible to do studies on the exact dosage, timing and factors involved in GED needed to stop a certain behavior.

Controversy surrounding the issue

There is controversy surrounding the use of GED because of the unclear intersection of medical use, ethics, who has the ability to administer the shocks, state supervision and the judiciary system. While Fields’ ruling allows JRC to continue with the aversive therapy, it may be mooted by an FDA proposal to ban the use of electrical stimulation devices to control aggressive or self-injurious behavior.

Beyond the power dynamic between government and health care, many, including the disability rights group ADAPT and the American Civil Liberties Union, oppose GED as inhumane. And, in 2013, a United Nations report by the Special Rapporteur on Torture said the rights of the children treated with GED “have been violated under the UN Convention against Torture and other international standards.”

What does the FDA say about the treatment?

The FDA has previously reported that electroshock therapy, such as GED, can result in physical effects — burning of the skin, trauma, including contusions, falls, oral injury, and fractures, seizure complications or impacts on the heart.

In 2011 and 2012, the FDA put forth warnings to JRC, saying the center was not following guidelines in regard to GED.

And, in 2016, the FDA put forth a proposal to ban GED, but the rule has yet to be implemented.



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    WATCH: Gaming disorder added to the International Classification of Diseases


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    Toddlers consuming too much added sugar, study finds


    Toddlers in America are eating too much added sugar, and the problem only gets worse as they get older, a new study conducted by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control found.

    Extra sugar consumption has been linked to high levels of obesity, cavities, asthma, and risk factors for heart disease later in life. It’s also been associated with higher cholesterol levels and elevated blood pressure. Added sugar is especially bad for children, as it sets diet preferences that could lead them to make poor nutritional choices later in life.

    The American Heart Association already recommends that children under the age of 2 avoid food with added sugars, including ready-to-eat cereals, baked goods, desserts, sugary drinks, yogurt, and candy. But researchers at the CDC found that some parents don’t seem to be following those guidelines.

    “This is the first time we have looked at added sugar consumption among children less than 2 years old,” lead study author Kirsten Herrick, a nutritional epidemiologist from the CDC, told ABC News.

    The study, conducted in Maryland, asked the parents of 800 children aged 6 to 23 months what their child’s “added sugar” consumption was in a 24-hour period. Herrick and her team found that the amount of added sugar increased along with a child’s age.

    For the 6- to 11-month-olds, 61 percent of the sugar in their diet was added sugar. But by the time children reached between 1 and 2 years old, that amount was even higher: 98 to 99 percent of the sugar those children ate was added.

    PHOTO: A young girl eats cotton candy in an undated stock photo.STOCK PHOTO/Getty Images
    A young girl eats cotton candy in an undated stock photo.

    And that added sugar added up: the oldest toddlers in the study, aged between 19 to 23 months, averaged about seven teaspoons of added sugar per day, more than the amount in a Kit Kat bar, the study found.

    The study is limited in some ways because sugar consumption was measured based on parent’s memory of what their child ate during a short period of time. In addition, the study has not been peer-reviewed. It was shared at a medical meeting.

    The research team also plans to examine the specific sources of added sugar young children are consuming in the future.

    But researchers have known for a long time that children should be getting their daily sugar from vegetables and fruits, not from added sugar, which contributes nothing but calories. An apple, for example, contains natural sugar as well as good fiber and nutrients.

    But high amounts of added sugar can be hidden in seemingly healthy food: a single-size serving of yogurt with fruit at the bottom can contain up to six teaspoons of sugar. In a regular 8 ounce serving of apple or orange juice, there are 5.5 teaspoons of sugar, on average. Dried fruits are also loaded with sugar — there are 21 teaspoons in one cup of dried fruit alone. Energy and protein bars can also contain a lot of sugar, and it’s also found in the condiments we add to foods: each tablespoon of ketchup contains one teaspoon of sugar.

    Although the U.S. government’s 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) states Americans over the age of 2 should consume less than 10 percent of their daily calories from added sugar, they do not yet include recommendations for children under 2.

    Herrick said that the CDC has recently launched a website that “makes some recommendations on which foods and beverage to limit in the diets of infants and toddlers.”

    Parents can expect recommendations for young children to be in place for the 2020-2025 DGA guidelines, but for now, less added sugar should always be the goal.



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    WATCH: Doctor viewing HGTV's 'Beachfront Bargain Hunt' spots possible thyroid cancer on part


    Transcript for Doctor viewing HGTV’s ‘Beachfront Bargain Hunt’ spots possible thyroid cancer on part

    tonight to a doctor’s instincts ck in W watching HGTV. What T surgeon noticed on a woman’s neck. Then reaching out toind her. Here Eva pilgrim. My name is Nico Reporter: That’s Nicole Mcguiness, featured on recent episode of HGTV’s “Bfront bargain Hu the 31-year-oldebrating the end of brain cancer treatment, starting a new chapter with a house in North Carolina. Wow. Reporter: But one those viewers, Dr. Eric Voigt, quickly spotted something. I noticed that shd in her neck. Repr: So, hened to Facebook to find her. I recommended she gets a sonond a biopsy. Repr:n days, th post reaching Nicole, who went to the doctor and learned she had thyrca R. Voigt saw this and brought it to M action and now I’ll be treated for it Reporter: And it’s not the fitime an eagle-eyed HGTV viewer noticed something and took action. 01 a nurse spotted a lump on the neck of tarek el Moussa, star”flip or flop.”she reacheout to el Moussa, who diagnosed and successfully treated for cancer as for Nicole, she’s optimistic. It’stmirae, in my opinion, that happened to see this on television. I can’t express how gratef am. Her treatment th her doctors, and is staying in touch with Dr. Voig David? Thanks to thatoctor tonight. All right, eva,nk Yo en we come back, that

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.



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    WATCH: What to know about new colon cancer guidelines


    Transcript for What to know about new colon cancer guidelines

    Turning now to agma” health alert. The an cancer society is out withew screening idelines for colon cancer and N will break it all down tore us. What are theseommendations and why so important to get screened. Here’s the thing, first of all we do expect these recommendations to be brought th some controversy like most cancer recommendations. Re’s what’ehind it. In people under the age O 50 the rates of colorectal cancer are yrting up 51% and spoke to the people at meal sloan-kettering anddhey were of people in their 20s and 30s — now, it is important to rest S occur over the age of 5 B they’re watching th tren when you recommendreased testing you have to take INT account costs,er risks versusefs but the reason behind it is that we know that if you catch colon cancer early, that canees and let me show Y what mean. If you imaginehis as the colon, okay, tumor there, no polyp, no obstruction. When a cancer starts to grow, it has to get really, ry big to comply block off the lumen or inside O the intestine before sing symptoms so if you screenple with colonoscopy orerests you can catch it early. Do we know W the rates increasing. That’s the thing. Terry, does it have something to do with diet and obesity? We know that there arether factors that increase the risk of col cancer, family history, certain genetic mutations. Polyp, inflammatory bowel disease, increased rat consion. First of all, I think when you talk about lowering risks there are certainleneral guidelines. Screening, dietary change, aspirin for some on the advice of their physician, genet testing F S and be aware ofsymptoms. Breakfast, T is what we should go for, ls of fiber. My favorit breakfast but this is best for the colon. Iiced that was over on your side. This is mvorite. DI you notice how I did that? I did notice at. All right, Jen, alw .

    This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.



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